Summers: Push for Central Banking institutions to Focus on ' Remote' Weather Risk Is Attempt to Move Climate Legislation ' With the Back Door'

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Throughout an interview aired on Friday’s broadcast of Bloomberg’s “Wall Street Week, ” Harvard Professor, economist, Director from the National Economic Council below President Barack Obama, plus Treasury Secretary under Leader Bill Clinton Larry Summers stated that even though there is a movement for main banks “to start concentrating on what they call climate dangers, as if those were main, systemic financial risks” this kind of systemic financial risks are usually “quite remote” and much from the enthusiasm is “from those who couldn’t legislate things about weather through the front door and so they consider to legislate them with the back door, through main bank regulatory policies. ”

Summers mentioned, “I think that people ought to make investments largely on the basis of the actual ultimate prospects are. I believe the problem comes when people who have really have an environmental inspiration try to attach an economic inspiration and make economic fights that aren’t really quite strong. I think there’s been an entire movement in the central financial community to start focusing on the actual call climate risks, as though those were central, systemic financial risks. And I do not think the evidence has have you been produced that genuine worry about systemic financial danger of the kind we had within 2008 during the crisis, from the kind that reared the head in the immediate consequences of COVID, that which is something that is likely to come from environment issues. It seems to me to become a quite remote risk. ”

He ongoing, “And I think a lot of the passion came from people who couldn’t legislate things about climate through the doorway and so they want to try to legislate them through the back doorway, through central bank regulating policies. And I’m certainly not very enthusiastic about all of that. ”

Adhere to Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett

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