Poll Shows Divide Between Hispanic Voters And Democrats On Government’s Intentions

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Trafalgar polling data released Tuesday shows Hispanic and Democratic voters have an almost 50-point divide between how each group views federal bureaucracies.

An overwhelming majority of Democratic Party voters still believe the federal government is a non-partisan entity that serves the public, not political interests. In contrast, the opposite is true among Hispanic voters, the Trafalgar poll shows.

Over 72% of Democrats said government bureaucracies like the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) still “serve the American public and are a useful and effective way to implement laws Congress passes,” the poll reported. (RELATED: How Did ‘The Least Racially Diverse,’ And Most Radical Faction Of The Left Hijack The Democrat Party?)

In comparison, the majority of Hispanic voters (62.5%) felt the opposite was true: that federal bureaucracies have “grown too large and only serve their own political interests,” according to Trafalgar. The poll showed that 16.3% of Democratic voters agreed with Hispanics regarding the federal government’s intentions.

Hispanic voters aligned more with Republican voters’ views on whether the federal government still serves the American public, or if its goal is to push partisan political interests, according to the data.

Almost 90% of Republican Party voters told Trafalgar that federal government bureaucracies were too bloated and had stopped serving the interests of the American people, the poll reported.

Black and Asian voters are still mostly aligned with the Democratic Party’s views on federal bureaucracies, according to the poll. Over 56% of Asian and 49.3% of black voters agreed with the Democratic Party’s views about the size and mission of the federal government, Trafalgar reported.

The poll surveyed 1,080 likely general election voters from July 24-28 with a margin of error of +/-2.9%.

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