Pentadecanoic Acid: The New Essential Fatty Acid

Pentadecanoic Acid and the Full-Fat Paradox

Around 40 years ago, doctor-types started telling people to cut down on their intake of saturated fats so that their cholesterol and subsequent risk of heart disease would dwindle down.

People listened. In the 20 or so years that followed, average whole milk consumption per person dropped from around 283 grams (a little more than a cup) to 65 grams per day, a more-than four-fold reduction.

You can credit this recommendation with nearly eradicating obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

What’s that? That didn’t happen? All those things got worse despite the decrease in whole milk consumption?

Now it might just be a case of “correlation fallacy” where the decrease in whole milk consumption had nothing to do with the rising incidence of those diseases. But maybe not. A study involving 25,000 children that spanned 18 years gave a surprising clue: Kiddies who drank whole milk had a lower risk of obesity compared to children who drank down the watery brews that are non-fat or 1%-fat milk.

But there’s more. Several other studies have found associations between full-fat dairy intake and reduced incidence of several diseases. Could pentadecanoic acid be responsible?

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