the bongino report

“Cocaine Bear” Director Elizabeth Banks Plays the Victim Yet Again, Claims to Have Been Told That Male Actors Won’t Follow a Female Director

Seemingly having learned nothing from the widespread eye-rolling elicited by her last few attempts to garner credibility by playing the ‘gender discrimination’ card, Elizabeth Banks has once again raised the claim that she finds herself at a constant disadvantage in Hollywood because of her gender.

Rita Repulsa, Elizabeth Banks, prepares for her marriage with Goldar in Power Rangers (2018), Lionsgate Films

RELATED: Elizabeth Banks And Sigourney Weaver-Led Pro-Abortion Film ‘Call Jane’ Absolutely Bombs In Box Office Debut

Banks revisited this tired claim during a recent interview given to Yahoo! Entertainment’s Kevin Polowy in promotion of her upcoming directorial feature, Cocaine Bear.

At one point asked by Polowy about for her thoughts on “working with the late great Ray Liotta”, who appears in the film posthumously as the drug kingpin Syd Dentwood, Banks replied, “He was really excited to do it. He came very joyfully to this project. Very game. Actually, after he read the script, he asked for more jokes.”

“I knew Ray a little bit from a project we’d done a decade ago,” she then recalled, making a nod to their time working together on 2011’s The Details, “and I knew, first of all, what a consummate professional he was, that he was gonna come to set and he was going to be ready, which he was.”

Syd Dentwood (Ray Liotta) orders his son Eddie (Alden Ehrenreich) to retrieve their lost cocaine in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

Syd Dentwood (Ray Liotta) orders his son Eddie (Alden Ehrenreich) to retrieve their lost cocaine in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

“And that he was going to commit to the bit,” the Power Rangers (2017) star added. “I mean, some crazy things happened to Ray Liotta in this movie. I don’t want to give anything away, but he was fully committed to that stuff from minute one. Everything from the wig he wore to the clothes, he was just so game.”

Using this moment to slightly pivot the topic of the conversation, Banks then asserted, “I mean, I’m just so grateful that he blessed this movie – that he trusted me as a director.”

Pablo Eskobear kicks off his wild ride in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

Pablo Eskobear kicks off his wild ride in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

RELATED: Elizabeth Banks Is Creating An Adult Sequel Series For The Flintstones, It Already Sounds Terrible

To this end, she explained, “I wanted to make a big [film], this has a lot of action and CGI, and it’s a very muscular, masculine kind of a project, and I’ve been told by people [in Hollywood], ‘I don’t know if you can direct those things because I don’t know if male actors will follow you.'”

“And I say to that, ‘When Henry Hill [Liotta’s character in Goodfellas] follows you, you can make anything you want,'” the director ultimately declared. “So that was the gift that Ray gave to me. He gave me the confidence to know that I can direct anybody doing anything.”

Pablo Eskobar is ready to party in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

As noted above, this is far from the first time Banks has attempted to promote her work by banking on identity politics.

Speaking to the Herald Sun in 2019 ahead of the premiere of her then-upcoming Charlie’s Angels reboot, the director warned that “if this movie doesn’t make money it reinforces a stereotype in Hollywood that men don’t go see women do action movies.”

“They’ll go and see a comic book movie with Wonder Woman and Captain Marvel because that’s a male genre,” she said. “So even though those are movies about women, they put them in the context of feeding the larger comic book world, so it’s all about, yes, you’re watching a Wonder Woman movie but we’re setting up three other characters or we’re setting up Justice League.”

Rita Repulsa (Elizabeth Banks) descends upon Angel Grove in Power Rangers (2017), Lionsgate Films

Rita Repulsa (Elizabeth Banks) descends upon Angel Grove in Power Rangers (2017), Lionsgate Films

She would even use such rhetoric to explain why her aforementioned reboot failed miserably at the box office.

Asked by The New York Times in 2022 if she had learned any lessons from the bombing of Charlie’s Angels, Banks recalled, “It was very stressful, partly because when women do things in Hollywood it becomes this story.”

Bosley (Elizabeth Banks) finds herself in trouble in Charlie's Angels (2019), Sony Pictures

Bosley (Elizabeth Banks) finds herself in trouble in Charlie’s Angels (2019), Sony Pictures

“There was a story around Charlie’s Angels that I was creating some feminist manifesto,” she claimed. “I was just making an action movie. I would’ve liked to have made Mission: Impossible, but women aren’t directing Mission: Impossible. I was able to direct an action movie, frankly, because it starred women and I’m a female director, and that is the confine right now in Hollywood.”

“I wish that the movie had not been presented as just for girls, because I didn’t make it just for girls,” Banks lamented. “There was a disconnect on the marketing side of it for me.”

Bosley (Elizabeth Banks) plays getaway driver for the titular Angels in Charlie's Angels (2019), Sony

Bosley (Elizabeth Banks) plays getaway driver for the titular Angels in Charlie’s Angels (2019), Sony

“I would’ve liked to have made Mission: Impossible, but women aren’t directing Mission: Impossible,” Banks told  I was able to direct an action movie, frankly, because it starred women and I’m a female director, and that is the confine right now in Hollywood.”

“I wish that the movie had not been presented as just for girls, because I didn’t make it just for girls,” she lamented. “There was a disconnect on the marketing side of it for me.”

Bosley (Elizabeth Banks) prepares to outfit the Angels for their next sortie in Charlie's Angels (2019), Sony Pictures

Bosley (Elizabeth Banks) prepares to outfit the Angels for their next sortie in Charlie’s Angels (2019), Sony Pictures

“[I had been] told by a big producer of big action movies that I couldn’t direct action, that male actors were not going to follow me,” the director then alleged. “He was flummoxed at the idea that a woman would be able to lead The Rock on a C.G.I. screen, I guess? That was said by someone with a lot of power in our industry to my face.”

Inspired by the real world exploits of one Pablo Eskobear, Cocaine Bear hits theaters on February 24th.

Sari (Keri Russell) attempts to make herself scarce in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

Sari (Keri Russell) attempts to make herself scarce in Cocaine Bear (2023), Universal Pictures

NEXT: Elizabeth Banks Blames Failure Of ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Reboot On Film Being Marketed “As Just For Girls”, Ignores Her Own Role In The Narrative


Read More From Original Article Here:

" Conservative News Daily does not always share or support the views and opinions expressed here; they are just those of the writer."

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker