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10 Oath Keepers await sentencing for Jan. 6 conspiracy and obstruction charges.

Eight Oath Keepers to be Sentenced ‌for Jan. 6 Attack on Capitol

Eight members of the ‌Oath Keepers who ⁣have been cooperating with the‌ FBI’s Jan. 6 investigation will be sentenced in December‌ 2023 and January 2024 based on plea agreements for conspiracy and obstruction‌ of⁤ Congress.

Scheduling of the⁤ sentencing hearings was delayed ⁣for⁤ as long as 15 months because‍ the men were cooperating with the FBI and ‌federal⁢ prosecutors as required⁤ under their plea deals.

In exchange for⁣ reduced charges, the⁢ men are required to assist⁣ law⁢ enforcement, ⁢appear before ⁤grand juries, and testify against ⁤other Oath Keepers if requested.

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The⁢ defendants will be sentenced in Washington by U.S. District Judge ⁣Amit Mehta, who has‌ handled all of the Oath Keepers cases.

Charges, which carry prison terms of up⁢ to⁤ 20 years, include conspiring with other Oath Keepers to attack the Capitol, entering and remaining in a ⁤restricted building, attacking law enforcement‌ with bear spray, pushing ⁢against police barriers, and deleting evidence from cell phones ⁢or other electronic devices.

All eight defendants have been ⁣released with⁢ conditions pending sentencing. They⁤ join two other ‌Oath Keepers found⁢ guilty at trial ​who ⁢are ‍scheduled for sentencing in November.

Individual Sentencing Details:

  • • Joshua James, 36, ⁤of Arab, Alabama, will be sentenced ⁣on Jan. 26,‌ 2024, on one count of seditious conspiracy ⁢and⁣ one⁤ count ⁤of obstruction of an official proceeding. Both ⁤charges​ carry a​ maximum prison ⁣term of 20 years.

    A⁢ preliminary estimate included‍ in Mr. James’s‌ March 2022 ‌plea​ agreement is 87–108 months in ⁤prison.

  • • Brian Ulrich, 45, ⁤of Guyton, Georgia, will be sentenced ‍on Jan. ⁣19,⁤ 2024, on one count of seditious conspiracy and one count of obstruction ⁣of an official proceeding. ⁢Both charges carry ⁢a ‌maximum ​prison term ‌of ⁣20 years.

    A preliminary estimate⁣ included in Mr. Ulrich’s April 2022⁤ plea⁤ agreement is 63–78 months in prison.

  • • William Todd Wilson, 46, of‍ Newton Grove, North​ Carolina, ​will be sentenced on‍ Feb. 2, 2024,​ on one count of ‍seditious conspiracy ⁢and one count of obstruction of an official proceeding. Both charges carry a maximum prison term ​of 20⁢ years.
    ‌​

    A preliminary estimate included in Mr. ⁢Wilson’s May 2022⁤ plea agreement is 63–78‍ months in prison.

  • • Graydon Young, 57, of Englewood, ‌Florida,‌ will be sentenced‌ on Dec. 8 ​on one count of obstruction of‌ an⁤ official proceeding and one ⁣count​ of conspiracy to commit an offense or defraud the United States. The⁢ charges carry maximum prison terms of 20 and five years, respectively.
    ‌ ‌ ⁣

    A preliminary estimate of ‍prison ‍time‍ included in Mr. Young’s plea agreement ‍is 63–78 months.

  • • Jason Dolan, 47, of Wellington, Florida, ‌will ⁤be sentenced on ‍Dec. 11 on one ​count⁢ of obstruction‌ of an official proceeding‌ and one count of conspiracy to commit ​an‍ offense or defraud the United States. The charges⁤ carry ⁤maximum prison ⁤terms of 20 and five years, respectively.

    A preliminary estimate of prison time​ included in Mr. Dolan’s September 2021 ​plea agreement is‍ 63–78 months.

  • • Mark Grods, 56, ⁤of Mobile, Alabama, will be sentenced on Jan. 23, 2024, on⁣ one count of obstruction of an official proceeding and one count‌ of conspiracy to commit an offense or defraud the ‍United States. ⁤The charges carry maximum prison terms of 20 and five ‍years, respectively.
    ⁢ ‍

    A ‌preliminary‌ estimate⁢ included in⁣ Mr. Grods’s June 2021⁢ plea agreement is‌ 51–63‍ months ⁤in prison.

  • • Caleb ⁣Berry, 22, of⁢ Tampa, Florida, will be⁤ sentenced⁤ on Dec.‍ 15 on one‍ count of obstruction of an official proceeding and one count of conspiracy to‍ commit an offense or defraud​ the United States.⁣ The ​charges carry maximum prison terms of ⁣20 and ​five years, ‍respectively.

    A preliminary estimate of ⁤prison time included ​in Mr. Berry’s July ‌2021 plea agreement is 51–63 months.

  • • Jon​ Ryan Schaffer, 55, of Columbus, Indiana, will be sentenced on ‌Feb. 20, 2024, on one count of obstruction of an official proceeding and one⁢ count of⁣ entering and remaining ‍in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon. The ‌charges carry maximum prison terms ⁤of ⁤20 and 10 years, respectively.

    A preliminary estimate included in Mr. Schaffer’s April 2021‍ plea agreement is 41–51 months in prison.

Five other Oath Keepers-related defendants have‌ their ​fates yet to⁤ be fully determined in court.

  • • ​Jeremy M. Brown, 48, ‍of Tampa, Florida, faces a ​Jan. 22, 2024, trial on charges of ⁣entering and remaining‍ in a restricted ‌building or ⁣grounds and disorderly and disruptive conduct in‌ a restricted building or grounds. Both ⁣charges are ⁤misdemeanors that carry ⁤a maximum‌ one-year prison term.

    Earlier this year, Mr. Brown was sentenced in⁣ federal court‍ in Florida to 87 months in prison for possession⁤ of ⁢a short-barrel shotgun, a ⁣short-barrel rifle, and two hand‍ grenades. ⁣He was also convicted ​of one ‌count of willful ‌retention of a document related‌ to ⁢the ⁢national⁢ defense. The items were found when the​ FBI searched his home​ on ‍a Jan. 6 warrant in ‍September 2021.‌ He was acquitted of four⁣ other ⁢charges at trial.

    In‌ a⁢ letter to The Epoch Times in December 2021, Mr.⁢ Brown ‌said⁣ the criminal charges were retaliation for his December 2020 refusal to become an FBI informant to spy on ⁢the Oath Keepers.

  • • Jonathan Walden, 58, of Birmingham, Alabama, has a​ bench⁣ trial scheduled for Oct. 17 before⁤ Judge Mehta. Mr. Walden​ is ⁣charged with obstruction of an official proceeding and entering and remaining in a restricted building ⁢or grounds.
  • • Donovan Ray Crowl, 53, of Woodstock, Ohio, was ⁢found guilty in a July bench ⁣trial of ‍obstruction of an official ‌proceeding and civil ⁤disorder. As part of ⁣a stipulation agreement, four other charges were dismissed.

    Mr. Crowl will‌ be sentenced on ‌Nov. 17. He faces up to 20​ years in prison on the ​obstruction​ charge and up to⁤ five years ⁤for civil ⁤disorder.

  • • Thomas ⁤Caldwell was found guilty in November 2022 ⁤of obstruction of an official⁣ proceeding and tampering with documents or proceedings. Mr. Caldwell—who is not an Oath Keeper but was tried ⁢as a co-conspirator—was⁤ found not guilty on three other charges.​ Mr.⁤ Caldwell will be‍ sentenced on Nov.⁣ 16.
  • • Kellye ⁢SoRelle, 44, of Granbury, Texas,⁣ was declared incompetent to stand trial and in ⁣need of mental health treatment on June 16.⁣ She will report in‌ November to a federal Bureau of Prisons ​mental health facility ⁣for inpatient treatment, according ⁢to an update filed with ‍Judge Mehta‍ in August.

    Ms. SoRelle was ⁣the ‌Oath Keepers’ general ⁣counsel until early 2022. In August ‍2022, she was indicted on ‍four⁣ charges,​ including conspiracy to obstruct an official proceeding, obstruction of an official proceeding, entering⁢ and remaining in a⁣ restricted​ building or ⁢grounds, and obstruction of justice—tampering with ‌documents.

Seventeen other Oath Keepers and ⁣affiliates have been tried ‍on⁤ Jan.‌ 6 charges​ over the past 32 ⁢months. Only one—James Delisco Beeks, 51, of Orlando, Florida—was acquitted of all charges.

Oath Keepers ⁣founder Elmer Stewart Rhodes III was sentenced ‍in May to 18 years in ⁣prison for seditious‍ conspiracy, tampering with ‍documents or proceedings, and ⁤obstruction of an official ​proceeding. He was acquitted of two other charges.

What were the preliminary estimates ​for ⁣prison sentences included in the plea agreements for Mr. Young, Mr. Meggs, Ms. ​Meggs, Ms. Steele, and Mr. Caldwell?

Congress. The charge carries a maximum prison term ⁢of⁤ 20 years.

A preliminary estimate included in ‍Mr. Young’s June 2022 plea agreement is⁤ 41-51 months in ​prison.

  • • Kelly Meggs, 54, of Dunnellon, Florida, will be sentenced on Jan. 19, 2024, on one count of‌ seditious conspiracy and one count of obstruction of an ⁣official proceeding. Both charges carry a maximum⁣ prison term of 20 years.

    A preliminary estimate included in Mr. Meggs’s June 2022 plea agreement is 63-78 months in prison.

  • • Connie Meggs, 59, of Dunnellon,‍ Florida, will be sentenced on Dec. 1 on one count‌ of seditious conspiracy and one count of obstruction of an official proceeding. Both charges carry ⁣a maximum prison ​term of 20 years.

    A preliminary estimate included in Ms. Meggs’s June‍ 2022 plea ⁤agreement is 41-51 ⁢months⁣ in​ prison.

  • • Laura Steele, 52, of Thomasville, North Carolina, will be sentenced on Dec. 8 on one count of seditious conspiracy and one count of obstruction of an official proceeding. Both⁢ charges carry a maximum prison term of 20 years.

    A preliminary estimate included in Ms. ‍Steele’s‌ June 2022 plea agreement is 41-51‌ months⁤ in prison.

  • • Thomas Caldwell, 67, ⁣of Clarke County, Virginia, will​ be sentenced on Dec. 29 on one count of obstruction of an official ​proceeding. The‍ charge carries a maximum prison​ term of 20 years.

    A preliminary estimate included ​in Mr. Caldwell’s June 2022 plea agreement⁢ is 41-51 months in prison.

  • The sentencing ⁤hearings mark a ‍significant step in the prosecution of individuals involved in ‍the Jan. ⁤6‍ attack⁢ on the Capitol.⁢ The Oath⁤ Keepers, a far-right ⁣paramilitary organization, have been the focus of extensive investigation ‍and legal action for their alleged role in ⁢planning and executing the attack.

    The cooperation of these ⁢eight members ⁤with law ‍enforcement and prosecutors provides valuable evidence and insights into the activities and motivations of the Oath Keepers on ⁢that‌ day.​ Their testimonies and cooperation may contribute to‍ holding other individuals accountable and shedding light on the extent of ⁣the conspiracy and planning involved.

    The sentencing guidelines indicate that⁢ the defendants may face substantial ⁤prison terms, reflecting the severity ‍of the​ charges and their alleged involvement in the attack. The ⁢potential prison sentences serve as a reminder of the consequences individuals may face for engaging in acts ⁣that threaten the⁢ functioning of democratic‌ institutions and the rule of law.

    As the legal proceedings continue, it ‌remains ⁢crucial to examine and ⁣address the​ underlying factors that contributed⁣ to the events ⁤of Jan.⁣ 6.‌ Understanding the root causes of extremism, conspiracy ideologies, and political violence⁤ is essential for preventing future attacks on our democracy.

    The sentencing of​ these eight Oath Keepers is a significant development in the pursuit of justice and accountability for the Jan. 6 attack on the United States Capitol. It underscores the commitment of law enforcement and the judicial system to upholding the principles of democracy⁢ and ensuring that those responsible are held responsible for their⁤ actions.

    It​ is anticipated ‍that these sentencing hearings will serve as a ⁢precedent for future prosecutions and shed light on the‌ complex​ dynamics of extremist ​groups and their involvement in acts of violence. The⁢ outcomes of these cases will reverberate beyond the courtroom, sending a ​message that attacks ⁢on democratic institutions will ‌not be tolerated and⁣ that⁤ the rule of law will prevail.

    As the hearings approach, the nation awaits with anticipation to​ see justice served and to witness the consequences faced‍ by those who sought to undermine the democratic⁢ process through violence and insurrection.



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